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By IBTimes Staff Reporter | February 6, 2013 1:26 AM PST

A 13-month-old baby was crushed to death by a vehicle belonging to an official of China's one-child policy. This came after an argument had broken between the family of the deceased infant and the official.

The official from the One-Child Policy team in the Zhejiang province and a driver of the minibus that run over and crushed the baby to death were detained by the local police Tuesday, according to Xinhua News Agency.

Chinese state media reported that the baby was the third child of the family, and an argument broke out when the one-child policy team demanded a fine from the parents for violating China's child policy. 

The father of the baby told Chinese state media that the baby had fallen down during the tussle and he was too late to pull his baby when the officials started the minibus that ran over the baby crushing it to death.

In China, family planning policy is strictly implemented in an effort to balance the ever-increasing population.

Although forcing abortions and sterilizations are not really part of China's one child policy, such practices are widely enforced by local officials as a result of one-child policy pressure stemming from the central government.

Each parent can give birth to one child if they reside in cities, and parents in Chinese villages can give birth to two children if the first one is a girl.

Last month, Canada-based CBC News reported that a lot of Chinese tourists gave birth in Canada in a way to circumvent their country's one-child policy.

"The practice may seem deceptive but perfectly lawful," CBC News quoted a lawyer as saying.

According to CBC News, there are several companies in Canada that specialize in bringing pregnant women from China.

 In 2006, a blind Chinese activist and lawyer Chen Guangcheng was sentenced to more than six years of jail-term for helping its citizens to file cases against the one-child policy's officials and speaking against enforced sterilization and late-term abortions in China.

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