• Rate this Story
  • 0
  • 0

By IBTimes Staff Reporter | February 9, 2013 1:41 AM PST

More than 21,000 Canadians lost their jobs in January, according to the latest Labor Force Survey by Statistics Canada.

"21,900 people lost their jobs in January, surprising markets, which had expected a gain of 5,000 jobs after two very strong months of employment growth," reported Reuters Saturday.

Although Canadian provinces like Alberta, Saskatchewan and New Brunswick saw slight increase in the employment sector, provinces like Ontario and British Columbia experienced unexpected decline.

According to the survey, the employment in British Columbia and Ontario declined by 16,000 and 31,000 respectively while in Alberta and Saskatchewan, the number of workers increased by 9,700 and 7,300 respectively.

The decline was mostly among the people aged 25-54, the survey noted.

 While the employment rate fell down just after two months of high employment rate, the cost of houses in recent months has increased, signaling uncertainty of the global economy which apparently affects the business of Canadian oil in the global market. 

Prime Minister Stephen Harper Friday called the loss of the jobs "disappointing" but added that he was positive about the prospects for employment despite the global economic uncertainty.

"The job numbers of the past month are disappointing but the job numbers are quite volatile month to month," Reuters quoted the prime minister as saying.

"The fact of the matter is that the pattern over the last several months has actually been quite positive ... So the trend line has been positive and I remain optimistic that the trend line will continue to be positive going forward."

The Canadian dollar fell as low as c$1.0037 to the U.S. $0.9963 Friday, according to Reuters.

To contact the editor, e-mail:

  • Rate this Story
  • 0
  • 0
This article is copyrighted by IBTimes.ca, the business news leader

Join the Conversation

Follow IBTimes

E-Newsletters

We value your privacy. Your email address will not be shared.