• Rate this Story
  • 0
  • 0

By Vittorio Hernandez | February 14, 2013 10:46 PM PST

From talk about Pope Benedict's resignation on Monday, the focus is now shifting towards the election of his successor. The discussions run from the serious to the humorous.

One example of the latter is a twitter post by Stephen Fry seen below.

The tweet, which has become viral, while obviously taking a tongue-in-cheek approach to the selection process, is a far cry from how the cardinals would select who would be the next pope in a conclave by mid-March.

It also indicates how most non-Catholics view the papacy - as a backward-looking job with requirements that would not pass a society used to politically correct standards, but with nice fringe benefits as part of the compensation package. The key words such as misogynist, homophobic, not an equal opportunities employer and dogmatic says it all.

Ironically, in Huffington Post, a newspaper known for its humour, blogger Mark Kennedy discussed the papal selection process in what appears to be a very serious manner, noting that the procedure focuses on preserving eternal principles. Not surprising because Mr Kennedy is a professor of political management and director of George Washington University's Graduate School of Political Management.

However, upon closer reading, he still managed to make light of the selection process, pointing out that the selection process is done at the Sistine Chapel while the cardinals are staring at Michaelangelo's Last Judgment ceiling painting.

"Anyone who has seen this imposing chamber knows how impactful such a setting can be on the disposition of those within," he wrote.

However, he stressed the manner of papal selection allowed the Catholic Church to survive as the oldest institution in the Western world.

"While the Church has many goals, the process to determine who leads the Catholic flock has a very essential goal: to ensure that eternal principles remain just that - eternal," he wrote.

However, meme and cartoon makers appear to have a different perspective regarding the pope's resignation and the selection process. Some see it as either Pope Benedict's addiction or dislike for Twitter.

Or a furlough from his tiring job

Others are praying that Pope Benedict would still reconsider his decision

but groups that view the Catholic Church as an outdated institution view the decision and the selection process with some suspicion.

Whether you are pro- or anti-pope, one thing is certain -more papal jokes and memes, as well as serious news about the situation in Vatican City would come out in the next few days.

To contact the editor, e-mail:

  • Rate this Story
  • 0
  • 0
This article is copyrighted by IBTimes.com.au, the business news leader

Join the Conversation

Follow IBTimes

E-Newsletters

We value your privacy. Your email address will not be shared.